Posted tagged ‘presentation’

Speaking at Nordic Game 19th – 20th May

May 15, 2009

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Nordic Game is the premier nordic game developer’s conference, now on its fourth year. It has been going from strength to strength and last year was an exceptionally good year with great presentations, excellent networking and a nice, tight-knit feeling to the whole event.

Last year I had a chance to participate at a panel on emerging trends, and I was very delighted to be invited back  to speak again this year. My presentation on How to start a game a company at Casual Connect Europe 2009 got tremendous feedback, and I’m happy to presenting an updated version of it at Nordic Game on Wednesday 20th of May at 14:45.

I’m also participating in the “Art of the Deal” panel on Tuesday 19th at 13-15 o’clock . This is about pitching game concept to game publishers, but I hope to bring into the discussion what I’ve learned and experienced from pitching to VCs.

If you are at the show, come and say hi!

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Casual Connect Europe presentations online

March 13, 2009

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Quick note: the presentations from Casual Connect Europe are now online among all of the great Casual Games Assocation presentations and articles.  My personal favourites from the show include:

I had a great time in Hamburg, and Casual Connect Europe 2010 will definitely be on my calendar.

P.S. I will be speaking at Nordic Game held in Malmö from 19th to 20th of May. I will be reprising my “How to start a game business” presentation with more lessons learned since.

How to start a game business presentation featured on Slideshare!

February 18, 2009

Achievement unlocked: Get featured on Slideshare Frontpage. +50 Life is a game points.

Achievement unlocked: Get featured on Slideshare’s Business and Management section. +10 Life is a game points.

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slideshare-emailYEAH! ;-)

View “Confessions: how to start a new game business” presentation on Slideshare.

P.S. The screengrab from Slideshare’s front page is photoshopped. My presentation was lower down on the list.

Starting a new (game) business

February 17, 2009

So, what have I learned during the five months Everyplay has been operational? What would I loved to have known before we founded the company? What would be helpful to would-be entrepreneurs? And how much could I cover in 40 minutes?

With those questions in mind I set out to share my thoughts and opinions on how to start a new game business for the good people at the Casual Connect Europe 2009 conference. I was given the prefix “Confessions” so I used Everyplay as an example case in the presentation. We are still in stealth mode, so for those of you looking to learn about what we are building, there are a few tidbits in the presentation ;-).

I had a great time giving the presentation and luckily quite a few people found it to be useful. My thanks to everybody who offered their kind words after the presentation!

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I’ve included quite a few slide notes with the presentation for links to further information, interesting blogs and books. To access those, please download the presentation.

If you found the presentation useful, please share your thoughts in the comments!

P.S. Apologies for the crappy audio timings on the slidecast. After spending three hours battling with Slideshare’s buggy-beyond-belief slidecast tools, thus is the best that could be done.

Speaking at Casual Connect Europe 2009

January 27, 2009

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I have a very special relationship with the Casual Connect conferences. Back in early 2006 I was totally within the  core console games “reality bubble” and I thought I should learn something about the emerging casual games market, so I took the plunge and headed to the lovely Amsterdam for the Casual Connect conference.

It totally bursted that “reality bubble”. There was a completely amazing new sub-industry being born, where new game genres were created and new business models explored. Not only did I discover the downloadable casual games segment, but also the totally rule-bending Korean virtual goods driven online games segment.

In particular one session stood out: the “Hype or Real Deal” panel. Four CEOs and founders of diverse companies on the stage holding two large sign cards: Hype and Real Deal. The moderator would ask a question and each one of the panelists had to reveal their opinions simultaneously. It was a great format that stimulated a lot of heated discussion as the panelists had to defend their positions.

erikbethkeTwo questions that the moderator asked struck me: “Will virtual goods ever work in the western world?” and “Will casual games go online and become more like MMOs?”. Just about everybody in the panel called these “Hype” while Erik Bethke, the founder of GoPets, vigorously defended them being the “Real Deal”. Erik lost out then as the whole conference really didn’t think much of these trends. But I did. The opportunities were mind-boggling. I scampered immediately after the panel ended and waylaid Erik as fast as I could for a further chat.

I have to really hand it to Erik for single handedly blowing away my ignorance (BTW, you should read his excellent blog which he updates all too infrequently =)).

As we all know, those trends become the “Real deal” already in year 2008 and they are going a lot stronger this year.

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Speaking about how to start a new game business

It is an honor to be invited to speak at Casual Connect and I’m delighted I can be giving back a little as I received so much at the 2006 event. I will be speaking about how to start a new game business – something that I have gotten a bit of hands on experience during the past 6 months =). The session is on Thursday 12th of February at 11:00.

If you are at the event, I’d love to meet!

Rescue the princess app – funware by Lost Garden

October 27, 2008

Daniel Cook of Lost Garden recently gave a talk about applying game mechanics to user experience design, that is, funware. His presentation offers great insights and ideas on how to go about applying game-like structures in non-game applications thru using game design patterns.

According to Daniel Funware works because it uses exploratory learning to motivate the user/player. Learning becomes fun! This is also what Mihály Csíkszentmihályi theory of Flow discusses as the “optimal experience”. It’s pretty easy see how this is a powerful concept: simply contrast learning skills in Super Mario vs. trying to bend Photoshop to your will.

Daniel’s presentation is a must read for anyone interested in Funware!

Mindtrek – panel on the Business of playing together

October 9, 2008

I’m currently at Mindtrek, a 700 person conference on all things in digital and social media. The conference has been great so far. Hearing Marc Davis‘ talk about Yahoo!’s approach to web 2.0 and world 2.0 was a great and inspirational opening to the whole event!

On the way to Tampere we world’s first ever Ignite Mobile session (Ignite on a bus!) where I did a presentation about Funware. Slides and further info is now available.

At Mindtrek I did a 20 minute segment on the Business of playing together track talking about the changes in the game industry. I’ll also post that presentation along with the audio track also as soon as I can bend Slideshare to my will ;-).

The panel discussion following the three segments (me, IRC-Galleria‘s Ville Mujunen and Ironstar Helsinki‘s Joakim Achren and host Peter Vesterbacka) was excellent and lasted for more than hour. We had a great audience willing to ask hard questions ranging from policy making in virtual worlds to EULAs to the distinctions between virtual and real items and whether we can have multiple lives (one in a MMO, and then real life persona). Here are some quick’n’dirty notes from the panel

  • We live in the equivalent of feudal ages in terms of virtual world policy making and EULAs. Virtual World operators are benevolent dictators with pretty much unlimited powers. On the other hand the players have the final power, because the companies try to create revenue from the players, and the only way to do is to please the players. However, in terms of readable EULAs, player representatives in the world management and the rights of players are still highly underdeveloped. The interesting developments in this area include EVE Online’s Council of Stellar Management, The Avatar Bill of Rights, Metaplace’s simple Terms of Use.
  • Virtual vs. real. This was a great discussion on whether virtual items are as real to use as “real items”. The simple answer is: YES, virtual items are just as real. Brain scanning has been used to show our primal responses to receiving an item are “oooh, shiiny!” regardless whether it is virtual item or real. This really comes back to the values we instill in the culture/world we are in. The gift you get your friend is much more the physical gift. It is a social expression of the feelings and emotions your friend has for you. The on-going credit crunch was also used to highlight how something as real as “money” has become highly virtual. If your bank goes away taking your money with you, your money just became very “virtual”.
  • Multiple lives vs. roles. It is psychologically impossible for us to have multiple independent personas unless we are schitzophrenic. What we have are roles. I’m a dad, a business man, a colleague, a friend, a leader, a follower, a MMO player etc. I’m still one person and these roles affect each other. It seems there was confusion of the terms at the panel. Regardless of how we call it is clear that we want to have multiple roles to experience different lifestyles, to adapt to different types of social situations, for escapism, for just the fun of experimenting, …
  • Funware. I’m a big proponent of a funware (the use of game mechanics in non-game applications). I gave highly opionated comments on how funware can be used e.g. the save world thru cutting carbon emission.

Overall Mindtrek has been a blast. It has been great meeting a lot of interesting people from Finnish startups, VCs, game reseachers and academics and other cool people. Just today I sat down with a lunch with a random person only to find out that he is interaction designer, programmer and game developer. Wow, we had an amazing lunch discussion and had so many shared interests to discuss. This is the best part of Mindtrek – it is a truly cross-discipline, international event with really interesting people.